ookami_kasumi: (Default)
2012-02-24 11:38 am
Entry tags:

Dealing with Creative DOUBT

...I'm at the point where nothing seems right. Everything I write down is cliche, badly written, and has bad pacing. Yet when I was younger I would turn out stories one right after the other like a non-stop machine. But now...thanks to all those instructors and classes, the creative edge is now limping along like a dog with only one leg.
...I don't have an agent or anything published in the first place. So that does paint an extra layer of doubt upon the situation.
...when I discuss this, usually I'm berated with people saying, "Stop being so emo." As if depression were something that one can simply switch on and off.
...I guess what I'm doing here is ... trying to find some kind of sign, revelation or clue that I'm not a bad writer or that I'm just another writing loser.


You're not a bad writer or a loser of any kind.
-- You're NORMAL. :)

So what do you do...? )
ookami_kasumi: (ZombieLoan)
2011-05-22 05:16 pm
Entry tags:

Writing Serial Fiction

Writing Serial & Series Fiction
Not just another Novel idea


Please note, this is how the Professionals do it. Those of you who are Not professional are free to write (and post) as you please.


THIS is how the Professionals do it... )

DISCLAIMER: As with all advice, take what you can use and throw out the rest. As a multi-published author, I have been taught some fairly rigid rules on what is publishable and what is not. If my rather straight-laced (and occasionally snotty,) advice does not suit your creative style, by all means, IGNORE IT.
ookami_kasumi: (Default)
2011-05-20 05:17 pm
Entry tags:

(no subject)

An Opening HOOK?

-----Original Message-----
"We constantly hear people talk about a hook. I was just wondering, how important is an opening hook? How close to the opening does it have to be? Seriously, how many people pick up a book or story and put it back down after the first sentence or paragraph? Do we have some forgiveness here? I would think that a published, well known author might not need one."
--
Writer in Waiting
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

How important is a hook, REALLY? )

DISCLAIMER: As with all advice, take what you can use and throw out the rest. As a multi-published author, I have been taught some fairly rigid rules on what is publishable and what is not. If my rather straight-laced (and occasionally snotty,) advice does not suit your creative style, by all means, IGNORE IT.
ookami_kasumi: (Default)
2011-05-20 05:05 pm
Entry tags:

(no subject)


The most detrimental problem for a writer, isn’t Failure – it’s SUCCESS.

The Mystery of the Missing Best-selling Authors.
-- You see it all the time. A hot new author puts out book after book, then suddenly the story quality drops, and those books aren’t so wonderful any more. But you keep buying them on the hope that what made them great (in the first 9 books,) will resurface. Instead, that author suddenly drops off the face of the earth; sometimes for years – sometimes forever.

What Happened?
THIS is what happened...  )

DISCLAIMER: As with all advice, take what you can use and throw out the rest. As a multi-published author, I have been taught some fairly rigid rules on what is publishable and what is not. If my rather straight-laced (and occasionally snotty,) advice does not suit your creative style, by all means, IGNORE IT.
ookami_kasumi: (Default)
2011-05-17 05:20 pm
Entry tags:

Copywriting Secrets to Writing Fiction


Everything I learned about Writing Fiction
I learned from Commercial Copywriting.

Wanna know what I know?  )
ookami_kasumi: (SweeneyTodd)
2011-05-17 04:22 pm
Entry tags:

"The story must have an Ending?"

"The story must have an Ending?"

----- Original Message -----
...There's a Short Fiction Contest going on. I already thought of my theme and I have a complete first draft. But, I'm confused. One of the rules says "The story must have an ending." I don't know what that means. You see, usually I like to end my stories with a feeling that the characters go on with their lives even after the plot is solved. Thing is, I don't know if that could be considered an "open ending" or "inconclusive ending" or whatsoever, or not even an ending at all!
-- Anxious Contestant
What this means... )
ookami_kasumi: (Default)
2011-04-08 10:26 pm
Entry tags:

Modern Fiction Story Structures

Modern Fiction Story Structures

PLOT ARC - The events that happen while the characters make other plans.
CHARACTER ARC -
The emotional roller-coaster that the character suffers in dealing with the Plot.

Where to go from there.

 

Read more...? )
ookami_kasumi: (Llama Shino)
2011-04-07 06:32 pm
Entry tags:

The Subtle STATIC TRAIT ~ Secret Weapon of the Clever Writer

The Subtle STATIC TRAIT
Secret Weapon of the Clever Writer

The Static Trait is the small personal HABIT an individual character displays which reveals their personal Neurosis, their driving NEED, especially in stressful situations. This habitual or even ritual behavior acts as both their greatest source of trouble and the linchpin to their success. It's the individual character's "Accident Waiting to Happen".


How to USE a Static Trait... )
ookami_kasumi: (WolfSpice)
2011-03-18 06:26 pm
Entry tags:

Crossing Genres


Crossing Genres

Every genre has core elements that make that genre that genre. In order to Cross Genres properly, you need to know each of your genre’s distinctive elements and make them Equally Important in the story.

Simple, no? However...

How to Mix & Match Genres... )
ookami_kasumi: (ZombieLoan)
2011-03-07 02:40 pm
Entry tags:

REALITY CHECK! Writing for PROFIT

REALITY CHECK!
Writing for Profit - It's Not just an Adventure - It's a JOB
.

Whoever told you that writing fiction for publication - for money - is supposed to be Artistic, Fun, or Easy -- LIED.

Writing may look artistic, and creative writing certainly is artistic (that's why they call it Creative writing,) but writing for a living; writing for publication with the intent to get paid on a regular basis is NOT artistic, it's NOT always fun, and it certainly is NOT easy.

Writing for publication is WORK. Sure, some of it is fun, but the bulk of it is mind-bending, eye-straining work. Don't get me wrong, creativity is part of the job of writing for a living, but if you think us professional writers turn on "the Creative Muse" at 8 AM and shut her back off again at 5 PM then you are missing the point entirely.

So you wanna write for Money?  )
ookami_kasumi: (WolfSpice)
2009-10-05 12:11 pm
Entry tags:

Plot Devices: Deus Ex Machina or Chekhov's Gun?


Plot Devices:
Deus Ex Machina?
Or
Chekhov's Gun?

----Original Message----
"What are your thoughts on Good Deus Ex Machinas? I find them hard to pull off realistically in a plot." -- Puzzled Writer
~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A GOOD Deus Ex Machina? )
ookami_kasumi: (WolfSpice)
2009-10-05 11:54 am
Entry tags:

Plotting: The Murphy's Law Method



Plotting: The Murphy's Law Method
"What Can go Wrong SHOULD go Wrong."

If you want an easy way to plot out a story that your readers can't guess the end to by the fourth chapter, then THIS is the method for you!

Tell me More! )
ookami_kasumi: (ZombieLoan)
2009-10-03 06:46 am

10 Second Tip: Foreshadowing



Foreshadowing is when the opening scene of a story is a kind of nutshell prophecy for the whole story.

The Trick to FORESHADOWING... )
ookami_kasumi: (Default)
2009-10-03 06:37 am

10 Second Tip: Stories should make a POINT.


Stories should make a POINT.

“The true critic will but demand that the (story’s) design intended be accomplished, to the fullest extent, by the means most advantageously applicable…"
-- Edgar Allen Poe

In other words, not only should every character, object, and event in your tale have a reason to be there, the story itself should have a Purpose -- and a Motive.

What about YOUR stories? )
ookami_kasumi: (Default)
2009-10-03 05:34 am

10 Second Tip: You Don't ALWAYS have to Show. Sometimes you Can TELL!



You Don't ALWAYS have to Show. Sometimes you Can TELL!

Plot Pacing and Narrative Summary
Featuring: Harry Potter & the Philosopher's Stone
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Raped from: Randy Ingermanson's Advanced Fiction Writing E-zine



If there's one thing that any writer is guaranteed to hear too many times, it's the dictum, "Show, Don't Tell."

There is a lot of truth to this rule of thumb. The purpose of fiction is to give the reader a Powerful Emotional Experience. And the best way to give the reader that Powerful Emotional Experience is by "showing" the good parts, rather than "telling" them.

In short, at the points of highest action in the story, you ramp up the pace by spending more words, "showing" everything in brilliant, Technicolor, slow-motion detail.

But, um, what about the boring parts? Should you "show" those too?

Some of my agent and editor friends have complained to me in recent years that the manuscripts they are seeing these days "show" too much. Sometimes, it just plain makes sense to "tell," rather than "show."

Yes, you can TELL too! )
ookami_kasumi: (SweeneyTodd)
2009-08-27 03:57 am
Entry tags:

Structure of the GOTHIC Tale


Structure of the GOTHIC Tale
By Ookami Kasumi

What is the difference between a Gothic tale and a Horror story? Intent. Seriously.

What makes a Gothic a GOTHIC? )
ookami_kasumi: (ZombieLoan)
2009-03-16 07:49 am
Entry tags:

The Trackless Wasteland known as The MIDDLE

-----Original Message-----
The middle KILLS me. I freeze when I have to decide which way things are going to go, and how, and that happens during the middle for me.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

-----Original Message-----
Middle, middle, middle... It's the Slough of Despond!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

-----Original Message-----
The Middle is where I usually fizzle out.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Conquering the MIDDLE...! )