ookami_kasumi: (Default)



You Don't ALWAYS have to Show. Sometimes you Can TELL!

Plot Pacing and Narrative Summary
Featuring: Harry Potter & the Philosopher's Stone
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Raped from: Randy Ingermanson's Advanced Fiction Writing E-zine



If there's one thing that any writer is guaranteed to hear too many times, it's the dictum, "Show, Don't Tell."

There is a lot of truth to this rule of thumb. The purpose of fiction is to give the reader a Powerful Emotional Experience. And the best way to give the reader that Powerful Emotional Experience is by "showing" the good parts, rather than "telling" them.

In short, at the points of highest action in the story, you ramp up the pace by spending more words, "showing" everything in brilliant, Technicolor, slow-motion detail.

But, um, what about the boring parts? Should you "show" those too?

Some of my agent and editor friends have complained to me in recent years that the manuscripts they are seeing these days "show" too much. Sometimes, it just plain makes sense to "tell," rather than "show."

Yes, you can TELL too! )
ookami_kasumi: (SweeneyTodd)

Structure of the GOTHIC Tale
By Ookami Kasumi

What is the difference between a Gothic tale and a Horror story? Intent. Seriously.

What makes a Gothic a GOTHIC? )
ookami_kasumi: (ZombieLoan)
-----Original Message-----
The middle KILLS me. I freeze when I have to decide which way things are going to go, and how, and that happens during the middle for me.
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-----Original Message-----
Middle, middle, middle... It's the Slough of Despond!
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-----Original Message-----
The Middle is where I usually fizzle out.
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Conquering the MIDDLE...! )


ookami_kasumi: (ZombieLoan)
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Your imagination is a pond that you fish your ideas from. Like any fishing pond, what you catch depends on what you’ve stocked your pond with and how much you put in there. If you fish for only the occasional idea, your little ideas have time to breed creatively until they overflow the pond, leaping right out into your hand -- and onto your keyboard. If you fish a lot, you will have to restock -- Frequently.

A Dry Pond = Writer’s Block

 

Fishing for INSPIRATION? )
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-----Original Message-----

I want to write a story. I have a couple of ideas, but no idea what to do with them, or even how to begin! Help?! -- Newbie Writer
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So when you wanna write a story...?

Story writing for BEGINNERS...  )
ookami_kasumi: (Tyrant)

I Won't read a Fan-Fic if it's...?

You open the story, you start to read and CRINGE. Then you hit your back button and go find another story because that story...?
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Tell me how you REALLY feel!  )
ookami_kasumi: (WolfSpice)

The 36 Dramatic Situations
By Georges Polti -- 1868


After an extensive survey of literature, Georges Polti declared that there were no more than 36 dramatic situations. These are those 36.


What are the 36 Dramatic Situations?  )
ookami_kasumi: (WolfSpice)
Writing Adventures
A Summery...
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Note: This is the summery of a huge article I found about seven years ago on the ‘net. Unfortunately, I didn’t bother to record the actual name of the article or the author’s name. I was more than a little lax about how I collected information back then. Worse still, the bulk of this has been removed, rewritten and/or paraphrased for brevity and easy grasping. If you happen to know where this came from, please let me know!
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Read the rest!  )
ookami_kasumi: (WolfSpice)
Is your Special Character
Too Special?

Are you indulging in a few too many "special traits"? Is your story really an excuse to show off your Super Special Character? Are you committing a MARY-SUE/GARY STU?

--> Dead give-away: Your favorite character is YOU only BETTER!

Who is Mary Sue/Gary Stu? )
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DISCLAIMER: As with all advice, take what you can use and throw out the rest. As a multi-published author, I have been taught some fairly rigid rules on what is publishable and what is not. If my rather straight-laced (and occasionally snotty,) advice does not suit your creative style, by all means, IGNORE IT.
ookami_kasumi: (WolfSpice)
Advanced Character Creation
Hero ~ Villain ~ Ally

There are three essential characters in every story. There may be any number of side characters, but in traditional Adventures, and Romances of every stripe (erotic or not,) the main conflict is usually, if not always, a triangle of complimentary opposites.

Translation: You could tell the whole story with ONLY these Three Characters; perhaps not with any real detail, but you could still do the entire basic plotline.

THREE Characters?
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I'm sure you're familiar with the names Hero & Villain or Antagonist & Protagonist already. Those are pretty darn standard. However, always there, though seldom named is a Third character, the Ally -- the Companion to the Hero or Villain.

The Invisible Character: the Ally... )
ookami_kasumi: (HurtYou)
-----Original Message-----
Could you tell me more on plotting story points? I can get the big story idea well enough, but I run into a snag deciding the whole causality thing -- A leads to B, leads to C, …etc."
-- Mad about Plotting

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Ah, so you wanna know how to put all the theories together to make a story, do you? (Gee, you couldn’t pick the easy stuff could you?) Okay...

Advanced Plotting ~ The PREMISE... )

ookami_kasumi: (WolfSpice)

------------- Original Message -----------
I think the biggest problem I have is lack of detail. I can see things in my head, but other than the general surroundings, I'm always too intent on what my characters are thinking, or doing, or about to do to remember to add the details necessary to paint a really clear picture of where they are and their environment.” -- Wanna Rite Reel Gud

The way to deal with that is by writing what you can. When you’re done, go back and put in all the rest. Also, in situations like this, a beta-reader is your best bet at seeing where you skipped something.

As for What to describe and How Much to describe…

DISCLAIMER: These instructions are intended for Beginners, and for those looking for a few short-cuts to jump-start their writing. If this advice does not agree with your style of writing, by all means, take what you can use and ignore the rest.

For the record...
-- The description word counts limits I include in here are meant to be GUIDELINES not exact amounts, 'kay?

Getting the IMAGE on Paper... )
ookami_kasumi: (HurtYou)

Have you hugged your Beta Reader today?

Anyone who writes with the intent to be read by the public, from the brand-name published authors to the fan-fiction scribbler, will tell you that a good Beta Reader is worth their weight in GOLD.

ookami_kasumi: (WolfSpice)

Interior  Monologues?

“I was just wondering what you think about interior monologues, long passages of reflection?”

 -- Curious Kitty
 

 

ookami_kasumi: (WolfSpice)

 On Basic Sentence Structure for FICTION 

(Grammar Nazis BEWARE!)

 Everything I ever learned about writing Fiction DIDN’T come from school; not even college. In fact, the way one writes fiction is almost the complete opposite of everything I learned in school about writing.  

WARNING: Rant in Progress!   

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DISCLAIMER: As with all advice, take what you can use and throw out the rest. As a multi-published author, I have been taught some fairly rigid rules on what is publishable and what is not. If my rather straight-laced (and occasionally snotty,) advice does not suit your creative style, by all means, IGNORE IT.

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ookami_kasumi: (Default)

Essentials of a Short Story
Quotes raped from a critique of Nathanial Hawthorn’s Twice Told Tales by
Edgar Allen Poe - 1837


Edgar Allen Poe, celebrated as one of the finest short fiction writers of all time, was also a literary critic. These are bits of his wisdom on writing short stories, gleaned from one of his critiques.


ookami_kasumi: (WolfSpice)

Writing Emotions VISUALLY

"What is ...VISUAL writing?"
-- Visual writing is when the reader can SEE your story unfolding in their imaginations just like a movie.

* Non-visual: It was a dreary day.
* Visual: Icy rain slithered down the window glass from an iron gray sky.

This is more commonly known as SHOWING vs. TELLING.

* Telling: It was a dreary day.
* Showing: Icy rain slithered down the window glass from an iron gray sky.

 


ookami_kasumi: (WolfSpice)

Dialogue, Action & Description:
The LAYERS of Fiction

 

"If you have Action and Dialogue, do you really NEED Description too?
What is the difference?"



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